Man on Moon – Deconstructing NASA’s Audacious Deception

Year 2019 marked an anniversary of one of the greatest deceptions that USA has so far managed to pull off and get away with.

Alexandr Ivanovich Popov, doctor of Physics and Mathematics, wrote an excellent book, doing a step by step exposure of NASA’s faux Moon landing – from the early preparatory works, to the supposed flight, to the alleged return. What is so special about this book, is that it takes a very systematic, scientific approach to the whole issue. It also covers the angle of the Soviet Moon program, the politics of it in USSR and how it was surrendered to the USA for some questionable economic benefits. The latter is usually overlooked by the Western researches.

The book “Americans on the Moon – A Great Breakthrough Or An Astronomical Fraud?” along with many research articles is published by the author in open domain for everyone to read, but its reach is currently limited only to the Russian-speaking audience. Additionally, the site holds the book “Sojuz-Apollo: The Fraud of the Joint Flight. Facts and Suppositions”

The entire “Americans on the Moon” book is available as a PDF, automatically translated from the source site. The quality of the translation is very good. The book is also available on WebArchive through the entries here and here.

Below, as an introduction, I give my own translation of the front page of the Man On Moon site and the table of contents.




In the 60s of the last century, according to NASA, the National American Space Agency, the Americans made dozens of manned space flights with access to near-earth orbit. Among them are nine flights to the Moon, six of which ended with the landing of astronauts. These reports incredibly raised the prestige of the United States. However, year after year, the number of sceptics who having studied NASA materials about these landings, came to the conclusion that the Americans were never on the Moon.

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The 9th of May 2023 – Remembering the continued fight against Nazism

On this Victory Day, the 9th of May 2023, I want to remember not the Victory on the 9th of May 1945 in the Great Patriotic War and the World War II, I want to remember the continued struggle against Nazism, a struggle that Russia once again had to hoist up on its shoulders.

The perfect way to remember it, is another 9th of May celebration that happened a year earlier – in 1944 – when the Crimean city of Sevastopol was liberated from the German Nazis, who had been rampaging Crimea for almost 2 years, not unlike how the Ukro-Nazis had been rampaging Donbass for the long 8 years since 2014.

In a small way the liberation of Sevastopol was a Victory, but more struggle was still ahead, just like today.

6 years ago, when Artjom Grishanov made this clip, the continuation of the fight was only starting, the warnings in the documentary portion of the clip were not heeded, the “delirium” that Putin spoke of back then, has engulfed the “garden”.

And now, the article co commemorate the continued fight.


Liberation of Sevastopol from the Nazi invaders

The Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. Ruins of Sevastopol

On the 9th of May 1944, during the Great Patriotic War, as a result of an offensive operation that got the name of “Crimean”, the city of Sevastopol was liberated from the German Nazi troops.

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“Kill the Russians.” 105 years ago, the Finnish army staged the massacre in Vyborg. The truth must come out!

This year there is an anniversary of a dark page in Finish history that Finland studiously ignores – the genocide of the Russian population of Vyborg in 1918. Not only does Finland ignore it, but as was mentioned earlier in the article More on the Finnish finishing NATO move, they are actually proud of it, having release a commemorative 1 Euro coin celebrating the genocide…

In the Soviet Union this topic was “shoved under the rug” for the sake of the good neighbourly relations. Much like one did not talk at all about the part played by Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Romania in the WWII on the German Nazi side.

But times are changing. Ukraine turning Nazi, committing a massacre of their own in Odessa on the 2nd of May 2014, and Finland now openly supporting the Kiev regime and showing hostility towards Russia, opens up the doors for the truth to be spoken, neigh, shouted!

Below is a translation of an article published in “Argumenty i Fakty” on the 29th of April 2023.

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“Bukvar” – Learn the Russian alphabet like a 7-year-old native!

The question of learning the Russian alphabet – or Azbuka, as it’s called in Russian – is one that occasionally pops up.

At the first glance, it may appear hard – 33 letters, half of which are unfamiliar or have a different reading from Latin. But that’s only at the first glance. The first-graders in Russia can do it, and so can you! 😁

Enter “Bukvar” – the letter learning book for the afore-mentioned first-graders. Its approach is to present letters not in the alphabetical order, but rather in such a way that new letters can be combined with the ones already learned to build more and more complex words and sentences. That way the learner builds associations between the shapes of the letters and the sounds they make in the words.

A foreign student can draw on most of this methodology. One part of the learning process that will require a work-around is the expected native-speaker fore-knowledge of how certain words sound.

After a very short introduction on the linguistic notation used in the book, the plan is to present one new letter per day, with the explanations of the reading and of the example images used in Bukvar – this will be a great opportunity to learn new words while connecting the new letters to a context.

This image covers the symbology. It’s something you can come back to as a reference throughout the book.

Another aspect of learning new letter is writing. Though few of us actually write using a pen nowadays, when learning new letters, writing makes for a good additional venue of memorisation – you start associating hand movements and strokes with the shapes of the letters. Here are two writing templates used by schoolchildren in conjunction with Bukvar’. I managed to find the versions that I myself used in the distant 1980s 😁

Template 1Template 2 (the 1985 edition, originally found here)

You can skip over the first 4 pages (they tackle hand coordination and fine motion of writing) and start on page 5, practising the letters as they come.

Another letter recognition aid that I created for this course is the complete alphabet, where each letter is shown using several different typefaces, some closer to the printed version of the letter, and some – to the handwritten one. The images from this aid will be given as we learn each new letter, but you can download the whole set for future reference.

Don’t try to take it in all at once, but rather take one letter per day, and play with it.

And now, imagine, that you have just come to your first day at school – on the 1st of September – and are getting into the learning mood by leafing through the first pages of Bukvar, thinking how wonderful it will be to when you can read all the words…

To help you get into the mood, here are two postcards – from 1956 and 1959 – greeting you on the 1st of September!




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