Western-language words having Slavic/Russian/Rus roots

For quite a long time I was noticing uncanny similarities between English, Norwegian, German, Spanish and core Russian words. By core words, I mean those that were not recent loan words. (Though even among those there exist examples of the words that were re-introduced into Russian with a different meaning).

A few years ago I started noting down and collecting such words, but it was not until Lada Ray’s forbidden history & forgotten origins webinar that I found the incentive to publish this list. Lada covers many key words that are rooted in Russian. In her latest article, Forbidden History & Linguistics: OLD LADA, The Forgotten First Capital Of Ancient Rus! and Forbidden History & Vedic Truth: Why Greece Is Really Called ELLADA? she adds more important hidden-in-plain-sight connections to the old Russian history.

This article is also a logical continuation of the series of 7 publications which I translated in 2016: Uncovering Slavic/Russian language traces in the European History, and which I invite my visitors to [re]read.

The Scaligerian history, which our present-day world is built upon, is a pretty disjointed affair, with many fragments that do not add up (and not just in history, but also in Astronomy and in Linguistics), yet the court historians are hanging on to the scaligerian chronology with a religious zeal, ostracising any historian daring to question it, and shuffling any finds that contradict it into obscurity. History is thus now the only science that lives by the postulates from several hundreds years ago. It’s the same as if Chemistry today held onto the truths of Alchemy or if Physics still postulated that Earth is the centre of the Universe!

The best correct chronology has been built in the works of two Russian mathematicians A.T.Fomenko, G.V.Nosovsky – it is New Chronology. It accounts for and explains all of the discrepancies that the Scaligerian “official” chronology closes its eyes upon. Please read their short introduction to the History of the New Chronology. Linguistics is a vital part, and the scientists also address it in their book RUSSIAN ROOTS OF THE “ANCIENT” LATIN. The book has “A short dictionary of parallelisms” as one of its chapters. I have not yet had the pleasure to read this book, holding off until I was more or less finished with the collection below, wanting to keep my finding free of influence of other authors. Now that this part of my compilation is done, I will be familiarising myself with their book on this topic.

This is not the first time these parallels were noticed and attempted systematised. When Linguistics was still a young science, the following book was published in Russia in 1842: “The Root-worder of the Russian language, compared to the all main Slav dialects and to twenty-four foreign languages”. (The site of “V Ladu s Mudrost’ju” (“in accord with wisdom”) holds a lot of download links to the old printed Russian books, and those from 1700s onwards are pretty easy to read for a modern Russian.) The “Root-Worder” is built as a dictionary with very thorough research and referencing for every word.

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