The “Immortal Regiment” broke through the prohibitions in Germany – a reportage from Frankfurt

Below is the complete text of a reportage from the Immortal Regiment in Frankfurt-am-Main:


The “Immortal Regiment” broke through the prohibitions in Germany


(The white taped-over field in the upper left corner carries the text: “I am the St.George ribbon. I’ve been forbidden.”)

The marches of the “Immortal Regiment” took place all over Europe, but especially vividly in Germany
May 9, 2022, 16:20
Photo & text: Marina Khakimova-Gatzemayer
Frankfurt-am-Main

“I am an American. I go to your Russian rallies.” This unexpected meeting took place in Germany, where the Russian residents of this country held one of the numerous marches of the “Immortal Regiment” around the world. One of the participants of the action, a correspondent of the newspaper VZGLYAD, described her emotional impressions of what was happening.

– Last year there were so few of us at the march of the “Immortal Regiment” in Frankfurt that I had to carry the portrait of my grandfather in one hand and the shaft of our banner in the other. There was no one to take it. And now, look how many of us there are! – my friend Galya tells me, happily looking around at the people gathered at the Frankfurt “Immortal Regiment”. We have become friends with Galya in recent months – at rallies and demonstrations that the Russian-speaking population of Germany holds almost every week.

May 8 in Germany is officially the day of the end of the war. May 9 is a normal working day on which processions are prohibited. So our patriots had to celebrate the Victory over fascism on the eighth. Frankfurt is flooded with sunshine and packed with Ukrainian flags, pro-Ukrainian posters, portraits of Zelensky with the face of a martyr, anti-Russian street installations. We are already used to feeling like outcasts here.

They were preparing for the march for a month, texting, calling up, sharing news: “The government will ban the Immortal Regiment,” “No, it will only ban the Victory Banner,” “Military songs, anthems, marches are prohibited. Will we sing ditties about Hitler?”, “We were allowed only flowers and portraits of veterans, but the shaft on the portrait should not be more than a meter!”, “Maybe we should dress in the colour of the St. George ribbon?”, “In German social networks they write that everyone who comes to the “Immortal Regiment” will be evicted from Germany by force”, “Take your passports with you, everyone who celebrates Victory Day will be checked for German citizenship!”, “Where to buy a Russian banner?”

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Commemorating the 9th of May – No One’s Forgotten, Nothing’s Forgotten!

I wanted to make a simple and poignant commemoration of the 9th of May celebration in these difficult times, when Russia once again is fighting against Nazism – and not just in the Southern Russian lands, currently known as Ukraine (Ukraine is just a battlefield, where, after 8 years of genocide of the Russian population, it was said, “enough is enough”), but also on the wider, so far, diplomatic front against the resurgence of the Nazism in the whole West. When the West is cancelling and banning the commemoration of the Victory Day – both in the birthplace of the 20th century Nazism – Austria, and in the hotbeds of Nazi SS punisher battalions, like Latvia.


Then I came across the post by the VGTRK journalist Andrei Medvedev. Facebook twice blocked his account for this cry of the sould, which is a badge of honour in itself! Incidentally, Andrei Medvedev produced the investigative documentary, which I translated and now re-uploaded: The Great Unknown War. A must-see documentary about the WWII prelude. By Andrei Medvedev

“If I had to speak in the Bundestag like the boy Kolya, then I would probably say these words:

– Dear deputies. Today I saw a miracle. And this miracle is called Germany. I walked to you and looked at the beautiful Berlin streets, at the people, at the wonderful architectural monuments, and now I’m standing here and looking at you. And I understand that all this is a miracle. That you were all born and live in Germany. Why do I think so? Because considering what your soldiers did in our occupied territories, the Red Army soldiers had the full moral right to destroy the entire German people. To leave in place of Germany a scorched field, ruins and only textbook paragraphs would remind that there was once such a country. You probably don’t remember all the details of the occupation, but it’s not necessary. I’m just going to remind you of what the Wehrmacht and SS soldiers did to Soviet children.

They were shot. Often in front of parents. Or vice versa, first they shot at mom and dad, and then at the children. Your soldiers raped children. Children were burned alive. They were sent to concentration camps. Where their blood was taken from them to make serum for your soldiers. Children were starved. Children were eaten to death by your sheepdogs. Children were used as targets. Children were brutally tortured just for fun.

Or here are two examples. The Wehrmacht officer was prevented from sleeping by a baby, he took him by the leg and smashed his head against the corner of the stove. Your pilots at the Lychkovo station bombed the train on which we tried to take the children to the rear, and then your aces chased the frightened kids, shooting them in a bare field. Two thousand children were killed.

Just for what you did with children, I repeat, the Red Army could destroy Germany completely with its inhabitants. It had a full moral right. But it didn’t.

Do I regret it? Of course not. I bow to the steely will of my ancestors, who found some incredible strength in themselves so as not to become the same brutes as the soldiers of the Wehrmacht.

On the buckles of German soldiers it was written “God is with us.” But they were a product of hell and brought hell to our land. The soldiers of the Red Army were Komsomol members and Communists, but the Soviet people turned out to be much bigger and more cordial than the inhabitants of enlightened religious Europe. And they did not take revenge. They were able to understand that hell cannot be defeated by hell.

You should not ask us for forgiveness, because you personally are not to blame for anything. You cannot be responsible for your grandfathers and great-grandfathers. But I will be honest – for me the Germans are forever an utterly alien people. It’s not because you’re personally bad. It’s the pain of the children burned by the Wehrmacht that screams in me. And you will have to accept that at least my generation – for whom the memory of the war is in my grandfather’s awards, his scars, his front-line friends – will perceive you this way.

What will happen then, I do not know. Perhaps mankurts will come after us who will forget everything. And we have done a lot for this, we have foiled a lot ourselves, but I hope that all is not lost for Russia yet.

Of course we need to cooperate. Russians and Germans. We need to solve problems together. Fight ISIS and build gas pipelines. But you will have to accept one fact: WE WILL NEVER REPENT for our Great War. And even more so for the Victory. And even more so in front of you. Anyway, I repeat, my generation. Because back then we saved not only ourselves. We saved you from yourself. And I don’t even know what’s more important.”

I fully agree with these strong and harsh word. As long as the medals and deeds of my grand-uncle are remembered

In Memory of Georgij

And as long as wee remember that Russian soldier saved the World

And as long as Leningrad stays Unconquered

I remember. I am proud.

PS: If only there were more such patriotic, history-aware, honest Americans as Scott Ritter:

“Rus” – a story by S.T.Romanovsky with an interesting linguistically-historical revelation

First, a little about S.T.Romanovsky (1936-1996)

Stanislav Timofeevich Romanovsky is a Russian writer, since 1963 – a member of the Union of Journalists of the USSR, since 1972 – a member of the Union of Writers of the USSR.

Born on September 19, 1936 in the city of Yelabuga of the Republic of Tatarstan, the writer spent his childhood and youth years here. In 1949 he graduated from Yelabuga school No. 1 named after Lenin, then in 1954 – the Faculty of History and Philology of Kazan State University. After graduation, he worked as a literature teacher at the Yelabuga Library College. Since 1957 – Editor-in-chief of the newspaper “Ulyanovsk Komsomolets”. In 1964, by decision of the Komsomol Central Committee, he was transferred to work in Moscow as executive secretary, and then deputy editor-in-chief of the magazine Rural Youth. The decade for “Rural youth” was a period of prosperity and popularity. According to Romanovsky’s recommendations, for the first time in “Rural Youth”, the stories of V.M. Shukshin, with whom he was friends and whom he greatly appreciated, were published.

Throughout his life, Stanislav Timofeevich carried love to his native land, to Yelabuga, dear to his heart, to his beloved Kama region. In the story “River Pearl” he writes: “You can’t love the whole earth with the same force – it won’t work, you won’t remember it all. But the fields, forests, rivers, springs, ravines and small depressions that are dear to my heart, I love with burning strength and tenderness.” In many books you will find amazingly true poetic descriptions of our rivers – Kama, Vyatka, Toima, Kriishi, Tanaika, Karinka, Anzirka, Umyak and even small channels, streams, you will learn a lot about more than 50 lakes on Yelabuga and Tanaevsky meadows, visit the Big and Small forest, wander around Tanaevsky and Mortorsky forests, get acquainted with different ravines, hills, hills.

Romanovsky’s heroes and characters are in love with their region and are doing everything to make our city and villages more beautiful, fields fertile, meadows abundant in grass, rivers and lakes clean and fishy, forests healthy, inhabited by animals and birds. In many publications in the newspapers “Republic of Tatarstan”, “Novaya Kama”, “Star of the Fields”, etc., the name of Stanislav Romanovsky was mentioned more than once along with such famous Elabuzhans as I.I.Shishkin, D.I.Staheev, N.A.Durova.

The reason I am making this post is for one short story with very far-reaching and important linguistic and historical implications. The story is called simply “Rus”. In modern Russian “Rus” is synonymous with “Russia” as a more poetic form of naming that vast land. But there is one more, older, meaning to this word (which will not come as a surprise to those, who listened to Lada Ray’s Forbidden History & Forgotten Origins Earth Shift webinars).

I found the story published on a site dedicated to children’s books, which is excellent as it is children’s books that build a person’s future love for history and a person’s morale compass. I wrote about it earlier in “Stolen Sun” children’s rhyme by Korney Ivanovich Chukovsky as a moral code of conduct


RUS

The word “Rus” has also another meaning, of which I did not read in books, but heard first-hand from a living person. In the north, beyond the forests, beyond the swamps, there are villages where old people speak in the old way.

Almost the same as a thousand years ago. Quietly and peacefully, I lived in such a village and gathered old words.

My hostess Anna Ivanovna once brought a pot with a red flower into the hut. She says, and her voice trembles with joy:

— The flower was dying. I took it out to rus — and it bloomed!
— To rus? I gasped.
— To rus, the hostess confirmed.
— To rus?!
— To rus.

I am silent, I am afraid that the word will become forgotten, that it will fly away — and won’t be there any more, and the hostess will deny mentioning it. Or did I hear it right? It is necessary to write down the word. I took out a pencil and paper. For the third time I asked:

— To rus..?

The hostess did not answer, pursed her lips, offended. As if saying, how much can I ask? Two mass services are not served for the deaf. But she saw the chagrin on my face, realized that I was not mocking, but I needed this word for business. And the hostess answered, singingly:

— To rus, sokolik (translator note: a caring way of saying “falcon”, used when addressing a younger lad by an older woman – similar to “deary” in English), to rus. To the selfsame, honest rus.

Ever so carefully, I ask:
— Anna Ivanovna, won’t you be offended by my importunity? I want to ask.

— I won’t, she promises.
— What is rus?

Before she even had time to open her mouth, the host, Nikolai Vasilyevich, who was silently warming himself on the stove, barked out:

— A light place!

The hostess took hold of her heart from his barking.

— Oh, how you scared me, Nikolai Vasilyevich! You’re ill, after all, and you don’t have a voice… It turns out that your voice came through.

And then explained it to me in all detail:

— We call for rus a bright place. Where the Sun is. Yes, everything that is bright or light, that’s what we call it. A blond guy (translator: “rusyj” lad). A blonde girl (translator: “rusaja” lass). “Rus rye” is ripe. It’s time to harvest it. Haven’t you ever heard of it?

Finland – Life after NATO

Finland votes to join NATO. Well, to each their own, and Finland choses to exchange a prosperous border trade with almost transparent border without any remotely significant number of troops stationed along it to a locked border with a heavy concentration of military hardware and Helsinki added to the nuclear deterrent target list. If Finland wants to have the longest NATO border with Russia with all the consequences it entails, so be it.

In this post I want to present to translations of articles, one looking back at the history of Finnish-Russian relations, which the Finns prefer not to remember (or, maybe, they do remember, and are afraid of retribution?), and one looking at the possible future consequences, including economic, of the Finnish choice.

Dedicated to the upcoming ascension of Finland into NATO….
Sergey Vasiliev on April 15, 13:45

In 1550, the Swedish king Gustav I Vasa, by his decree, resettled several hundred residents of the city of Borgo, in Finnish – Porvoo, at the mouth of the Vantaa River flowing into the Gulf of Finland, ordering the construction of a commercial port. The river with the local name Helsing had several rapids – in Swedish “fors”, which gave the name of the settlement – Helsingfors. By the time it became part of the Russian Empire under the Friedrichsham Peace Treaty, the city had only four thousand inhabitants. Quite a backwater.

The first thing that Russians always did when they came to the wild lands was to build furiously and selflessly. The poor, shabby former outskirts of Sweden did not escape this fate either. Emperor Alexander I made Helsingfors the capital of the Grand Duchy of Finland. Under Nicholas I, a university was transferred here from the capital, named by him in honour of his brother Alexandrovsky. Alexander II granted the Russian colony its own constitution and a set of rights and freedoms that no one else enjoyed in the metropolis. Finland did not know serfdom. Finns were not recruited into the army even during the World War. They did not pay taxes, but enjoyed all the rights of subjects of the Empire. Finland had schools and gymnasiums with instruction in the Finnish language, had its own parliament and court. Along with the rouble, the Finnish Marka issued by the Bank of Finland was in circulation. The internal market of the principality was protected by customs while Finnish goods crossed the border of the Empire duty-free.

According to the tsarist authorities, all these goodies were supposed to arise a sense of gratitude among the local population, awaken a burst of patriotism and firmly bind the Scandinavian outskirts to the Russian Empire. Everything happened the other way around. Spoiled by the unprecedented benefits and privileges that fell on them for who knows what merits, the Finnish population gradually began to look at the titular people of Russia with disdain, as losers who were not able to organize for themselves the same standard of living as the Scandinavians, basking in the warmth of the tsar.

The Grand Duchy of Finland paid nothing to the treasury of the Russian Empire. The welfare of the natives exceeded the average Russian level. Thanks to this, peasant day-workers came from nearby provinces streamed to the Finnish village. Newcomers in Finland have always been disliked, a rural policeman could detain them, rob them for no reason, simply out of a sense of personal hostility. Archival reports have preserved eyewitness accounts of how, long before the revolution, the robbed peddlers from the Russian villages had to flee from the Finnish “hospitality”, while local policemen shouted: “Kill the damned Russians, nothing will happen to you!”.

Everyday nationalism, growing like a wild flower in the backyard of a Finnish village, as the local intelligentsia formed, successfully attached its root to the Russian treasury, flourished at the beginning of the twentieth century in the high society of the principality. In Finnish opposition newspapers, at first timidly, and then more and more insistently, appeals began to appear: “If we love our country, we need to learn to hate its enemies… Therefore, in the name of our honour and freedom, let our motto sound: “Hate and love! The death of “ryusya”! Or: “Russia has always been and will remain the enemy of humanity and humane development. Has there ever been a benefit from the existence of the Russian people for us? No!”.

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Did Josep Borrell just invite the Russian Army to Washington?

In the yesterday’s tweet Josep Borrell made one statement, with which I fully agree.

And a screenshot if the tweet is deleted:

There is a saying that one should be careful of one’s wishes lest they become reality, but not in the way one thought they would.

Yes, “this war will be won on the battlefield”, but, just like in the ages past, it will be won by Russia. And extrapolating the not so recent history:

The Napoleonic wars were finished in 1814 by the Russian troops in Paris.

The German Nazi wars was ended in 1945 by the Russian troops in Berlin.

The USNATO Nazi war (with ukro-Nazis as proxies) will be ended in 202x by the Russian troops in… Washington?

The way the economic warfare by the US/EU/NATO is expanded and how the Russian exclave in Kaliningrad is ever more blockaded, it look like the US and EU are all set for an all out hot WWIII…

In the best case scenario, “this war will be won on the battlefield” of Ukraine, with Russia securing the Russian lands, and USNATO, not wishing to push their luck further, will be looking for a diplomatic way out.

J.K.Rowling did not live up to the words of her Dumbledore

“It was important, Dumbledore said, to fight, and fight again, and keep fighting, for only then could evil be kept at bay, though never quite eradicated. . . .”
-Albus Dumbledore

“Dark times lie ahead of us and there will be a time when we must choose between what is easy and what is right.”
-Albus Dumbledore

Alas, J.K.Rowling could not live up to the words she put into the mouth of Professor Dumbledore. She chose the easy path of following with the flow of the Western support of the Nazi battalions in Ukraine and distancing herself from the fight against the resurgence of the Brown Plague that Russia is performing now.

I used to be a fan of Harry Potter in my late teens/early twenties, and the main allure of the books is in the concept of standing up to the evil, even when facing seemingly insurmountable odds, which appeals to the Russian soul. This is also the reason for why J.K.Rowling’s works had such a large following in Russia. However, the stance of the author in these hard and trying times sets a lager question mark regarding her honesty. As honesty is another trait dear to any true Russian. Russians also have a close affinity to the image of the Phoenix – or Fenist, The Pure Falcon, as it is known in the Russian folklore – which resonates with Russia’s constant rebuilding after every wave of aggression from the Western shores.

It so happens, that literary works sometimes take a life of their own, regardless of what the author originally intended or how the author later changed in their lives. The Harry Potter book series is one such work.

In fact, I wrote about the resonance of the unfolding events in my June 2014 post Ukraine events resonating with Half-Life2, Harry Potter and Star Wars, and the similarities have just become stronger since then!

So, onwards to Victory, Z Order of Z Phoenix, vanquish the modern-day Voldemort-Zelensky and his band of Death Eaters-UkroNazis (battalions “Azov”, “Aidar” and their ilk.) Maybe, once the Battle of Hogwarts-Donbass is won, J.K.Rowling will say that she was “Imperiused”-brainwashed by the Western MSM. But then, again, many a Death Eater reverted to that tactics to avoid the just punishment…

May The Truth prevail!

PS: Even the Greek Parliament was outraged when Zelensky brought an “Azov” neo-Nazi to the video address to the Parliament, yet they did not condemn Zelensky’s regime itself. Apparently they do not know how Zelensky was performing in front of “Azov” in May 2014 in Mariupol, thanking them and calling them the true brave heroes of Ukraine…

“Stolen Sun” children’s rhyme by Korney Ivanovich Chukovsky as a moral code of conduct

I was leafing the other day through the children’s books from my childhood. Many of those books are actually from my mother’s childhood, so two generations grew up on them.

It is no secret that a person’s moral compass is calibrated and adjusted during one’s childhood, and depending on which books the parent read to their offspring (or don’t read at all), so will the person become in his grown-up life. I was lucky to have grown up on Russian fairy tales and the children’s rhymes and short stories of the Soviet authors. One such rhyme-book drew my attention yesterday, unconsciously, for no apparent reason.

Rereading the words, parts of the rhyme still sitting in my memory from when I learned it by heart in my childhood, I understood why. This is a poem by Korney Ivanovich Chukovsky – “Stolen Sun”. The Russian text can be read and listened to at the Chukovsky Family site, and I will present an unrhymed translation of the verses at the bottom of this post. But why did it draw my attention?

It presents a clear concept of what to do in a dire situation – big or small, and it sets some premises for the child to learn to live by:

  1. realise that there is trouble
  2. get your act together
  3. try to negotiate with the wrongdoer
  4. and only if diplomacy fails, resort to force

And this is exactly what we see playing out on the grand geopolitical scale. Since 2007 Russia went though points 1 to 3 and is now resorting to the undesired, but unavoidable point 4.

Here are the photos of my mother’s book from 1958 with English translations below the corresponding pages. you can click on the images for the full-size versions.



The Sun wandered across the sky
And ran behind a cloud,
A hare peeked out of the window,
It was all dark to him.

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Censorship is Free Speech, according to YouTube and the Western MSM – Links to alternatives: Odysee and Rumble

I have a sense of deja-vu, yet on a whole different level.

In 1984 I, a Soviet schoolboy, got my first transistor radio with a short wave receiver. Not long after I stumbled upon the “enemy voices” – “The Voice of America” and “Radio Liberty”. Well, the lure of the unknown and the desire to get an alternative view kept me tuning in to the oft-barely discernable audio of these stations. They were blocked and often-times it was almost impossible to get a good signal. Their programs were interesting – some music, some historic programs, some incomprehensible to the mind of a youngster, going right over the top of my head. The historic programs were probably of most interest to me, and a second opinion was important to form a complete view, but I always had a nagging feeling of a hidden agenda. Only many years later, thinking back on those early mornings (the best reception time), I came to realise that they were trying to form a nationalist world-view in the Russians. In today’s world, a nationalist Russian is known as a Ukrainian…

But despite all that, it was important to have a second point of view, and it is my firm belief that the greatest mistake the Soviet government did, was to try to block these “voices”, instead of making them a part of the official newsfront, with explanatory commentary. Take today’s Russia. On today’s “Vesti” (the News at 20:00) they devoted almost 1/3 of the air time to re-transmission of what was aired on the American TV – CNN, FoxNews, official statements from the US President, commentary of the American analysts. This way a Russian person knows exactly what is happening on the other side of the border, what is being said and though about Russia.

It shows that Russia is not afraid of the competition from the alternative viewpoint and can present it to its population.

Not so in the West, which resorts to the same fallacy and practise, that was employed by the Soviet leadership – censorship and banning.

Yesterday YouTube banned Russian media outlets in the whole world, even in those countries, which have not asked for it. Just because people in the West could still use VPN to access the alternative view, like I could in 1984 though a short wave receiver…

YouTube to demonetize all Russian users, ban ‘state media’
YouTube blocks Ruptly video agency

It is not just RT, but also Ruptly, Rossia24 (a Russian-language news channel), Gosteleradiofond (an archive of TV programs and films from the USSR era), and up to a 1000 other Russian channels that got the axe and ban from YouTube.

Thankfully, there are alternatives, and YouTube is just flagging itself as irrelevant if one cares about freedom of speech. Here are some addresses:

Incidentally, while I was creating an accounts on Odysee and Rumble after YouTube banned RT, I came to a live stream of a documentary on post-Maidan Ukraine. It is called “Maidan: Road to War” and is a must-watch for those seeking to understand the prelude to the final accords of the conflict, which was going on for 8 years.

https://odysee.com/@RTDocumentary:4/maidan-road-to-war-rt-documentary:6

This documentary goes well along with the investigative piece from Oliver Stone “Ukraine on Fire”, which was deleted from YouTube a few days ago (after being up since 2016) and then disappeared from Vimeo, but which was promptly uploaded to both Odysee and Rumble in multiple copies:

https://rumble.com/vwxxi8-ukraine-on-fire.html
https://odysee.com/@DisclosureLibrary:2/UkraineOnFire:c

…and the second part of the above documentary, a 2019 “Revealing Ukraine”

https://odysee.com/@good2b:e/RevealingUkraine2019:8

PS: I used Odysee embed code generator to add the above films to WordPress

I would also like to remind of and recommend a documentary, which I translated in 2015: Project ‘Ukraine’. Documentary by Andrei Medvedev (with English subtitles)

Don’t poke the bear

In 2014 we saw this:

They continued poking….

Now the sanctions knock on the door, yet:


(Text: “Are you sure he’ll get scared and start begging for mercy?”)

Poking continues…

I know a hundred ways to pull the Russian bear from its den, but none to pull him back. Do not tease the Russian bear!

–Otto von Bismarck

Do not expect that once taking advantage of Russia’s weakness, you will receive dividends forever. Russian has always come for their money. And when they come – do not rely on an agreement signed by you, you are supposed to justify. They are not worth the paper it is written. Therefore, with the Russian is to play fair, or do not play.

–Otto von Bismarck

And one for dessert:

Showing the role of the Western MSM in this Information World War.

Post Scriptum

And a little bit more about bears and sanctions…

“- Is he asking for help?”
“- You won’t believe it: he’s threatening with reprisals”
The burning boat in the background is labelled “Libya”.


Title of the book: “Import replacement”

Newsflash!! Yes! Finally a chance for Peace – DNR and LNR are recognised!

I happened to watch the President’s address to the people live broadcast on TV, followed by the ceremony of signing of the documents recognising DNR and LNR, as well as establishing a security pact with them.

Putin signs ‘immediate’ recognition of Donbass regions

The address held an in-depth history lesson on the early history of the USSR, the constitutional norms left over from those days, when the national republics – including Ukraine – were formed.

This is History in the making!

“May there be peace” – Message from the first man in space, Yury Gagarin, restored in colour

‘May there be peace’: WATCH Yuri Gagarin’s iconic speech on 1st anniversary of his space flight, now IN COLOR

On the 60th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin’s landmark trip around Earth, RT publishes unique footage of his speech from the first anniversary of this flight – renewed and colored using modern neural-network technologies.

“I am grateful to those who invested their hearts, souls, skills, and hard work to fulfill this great mission,” Gagarin said in a speech that was first broadcast by Soviet television back in 1962, exactly one year after he became the first human ever to fly in space.

The first Soviet cosmonaut expressed his admiration for the Soviet scientists and engineers who made his flight possible by calling them “miracle workers.” Yet, he was equally welcoming to other nations’ efforts in space exploration. He symbolically greeted a US astronaut, John Glenn, the first American to orbit Earth, and welcomed him to the international “family of cosmonauts.”

“We know that our family of cosmonauts will grow bigger and bigger by the year and we will have more and more members joining,” Gagarin said in a speech that was originally recorded on 35-milimeter black-and-white film.

The first man in space also used the occasion to send a powerful message of peace as he said that cooperation in space between the US and the USSR “would open the way to stopping the onerous and pointless arms race as well as to channeling the joint efforts of both superpowers towards new scientific breakthroughs in space exploration.”

The conclusion to Navalny’s farce (for now). A stopped Western-sponsored coup d’etat in Russia

The continuation of the farce that Navalny’s handlers started with his fake poisoning and the subsequent staged return Russia with the fake “palace” video in his arsenal (outlined in my previous post The Navalny’s Palace – Fake Documentary from Fake Opposition (with a list of past crimes)) has come to the logical conclusion with the much-welcome imprisonment of the fraudster.

Navalny got his remaining 2.8 years of suspended sentence for defrauding of two companies converted into a real term. This was the outcome which Russians hoped for. Should the court have caved in to the Western pressure and release Navalny, that would have given a clear signal that he is above the Law and that Law does not apply to fraudsters in the employ of the foreign secret services. The reactions that I read on the Russian internet could be summed up as: “Why so little?!” Well, this is just one past conviction for one of his crimes. (By the way, Navalny has already got away with too much – he’s the only Russian citizen who managed to have two suspended convictions for fraud!)

There is still the case of defamation of WWII veteran, and the case of defrauding donors to his organisation (with the donated money spent on luxury and vacations). These cases were open and, coupled with the suspended sentence, were grounds for not letting Navalny out of the country in the first place. It was actually President Putin’s request that allowed Navalny to be transported to Germany, where he spent almost 2 months after his recovery on skipping his parole and on creation of the film targeting to defame Putin.

And there are strong calls to open a new case – this time for high treason due to Navalnys NGO direct appeal to Biden to impose sanctions on Russia. Seeing as sanctions qualify as an act of war, these people were calling on a foreign power to start a war on the country thatthey are citizens of.

The pressure on the Court of Justice was immense, including from the foreign diplomats, who amassed there to intimidate the judges and influence the course of a civil court by their presence. The hall of shame includes the diplomats from the following countries:

USA, UK, Germany, Poland, Denmark, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Canada, Finland, Japan, Austria, Czechia and Bulgaria.

EDIT: 05.02.2021 – Good to see Russia acting in accordance with the international norms and also showing backbone – Russia expels diplomats from Germany, Poland and Sweden for alleged participation in pro-Navalny protests. If only Yanukovich did the same with Biden and Nuland back in 2014, Ukraine would most probably not be a Nazi-infested impoverished and depopulated basket-case right now…

I want to translate another angle on the events, from an article published by Alexander Rodgers, and angle which posits that one last desperate a coup d’etat was de facto attempted in Russia.

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The Navalny’s Palace – Fake Documentary from Fake Opposition (with a list of past crimes)

Navalny’s fake documentary, readied for him by his American 3-letter-agency handlers in Germany (as uncovered by German journalists) and scheduled to coincide with his staged return to Russia has been peddled uncritically in both the Western MSM and on YouTube, where it was pushed as automatic “algorithmic” continuation to any watched Russian-language video, as well as being shown as a “commercial”. This manipulation along with some other peddling netted the fake documentary somewhere around 103 million views (as of writing) with 80% of views lasting less than 10 seconds. The goal was two-fold.

To entice the teenagers to go to protests, which failed miserably – only about 50000 gatehred across the whole of Russia with its 145 million population. And half of those gathered were journalists. Children as young as 9 years of age were drawn to the street in search of something cool and exciting, in search of a party. For this stunt Navalny got a byname in Russian social media sphere of “Oppositionsführer” (that’s how he was called in the German media), while the unfortunate children that he flocks to himself are often referred to as “Navalnyjügend”. But that is just his latest crime. Scroll down to a detailed list, compiled by Alexander Rogers.

The other goal was to place the Russian authorities in an awkward position: if they arrest Navalny for floundering the law (remember that he was released from the German hospital around November, while the deadline to register with the Russian penal services for his suspended embezzlement sentence was in end of December, so he had time to do it!), then it would demonstrate to the Russian population that Navalny and his ilk are above the law, and if he is arrested, then a mighty howling would be raised about “suppressing the opposition”.

Back to the palace video. That particular place in Gelendzhik was first attributed to the-then target of Navalny’s and his handler’s slander – Pesident Medvedev. When Putin was elected President, the “ownership” suddenly became ascribed to him. In 2012 Vladimir Kozhin, the Superintendant for Presidential Affairs gave an extended interview to “Rossijskaja Gazeta”:

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A review of the TV series “Grozny” about Ivan the Formidable, by Alexander Rogers

A new TV series was aired in Russia, a series about the famous Russian tsar, who has been so much defamed both abroad and then domestically. I was critical in anticipating this series, and it seems my fears were well-founded to a point where watching it would be inadvisable. In a way the vibe of “Grozny” series appears to be somewhat akin to HBO’s “Chernobyl” angle.

As I wrote in the article with the translation of the documentary Black myths about Rus – From Ivan the Formidable until our time, “Grozny” actually translates as “Formidable”, while from the set go a mis-translation of his by-name was adopted in England, implying something terrible. We see the same pattern with every Russian leader throughout history, who did something great for Russia (and, often, the world) – they’d be maligned, while a weak leader, who worked towards destruction of Russia, would be celebrated in the West. Sadly, the tune, started in the West would later get foothold in the Russian minds, thus weakening Russian self-perception.

Alexander Rodgers is a journalist and blogger with many astute analytical articles in the economic and political spheres. Below is my translation of his review of “Grozny” TV series, titled “Hard tsar or hard times. A truthful lie. The analysis of ‘Grozny’ series”. His analysis echoes my own perception based on the documented accounts. The original Russian version can be found at Kont and at the author’s LiveJournal page.


Watching the TV series “Grozny” leaves one with a very depressing feeling.

Although some of the participants in our discussions of this series wrote “We liked it”, it is rather to the same tune as “There were no evil NKVD officer in this film about the war, so it can already be considered a masterpiece.”

Only 90%, and not 100%, of dirt in a show does not make the show clean.

Ivan Vasilyevich the Formidable is shown in the worst traditions of the Pikulev’s authorship.

Valentin Pikul is such an unscrupulous author, who for his many years of “creativity” poured mud on many characters of Russian history. And he devoted a whole trilogy to denigrating Grozny.
At the same time, he never worked in the archives and did not even try to rely on historical sources, but wrote as he saw fit, like another similar writer – Vladimir Sorokin (the latter also likes to attribute his homoerotic fantasies to historical characters).
In general, many Russian historians from the time of the Russian Empire and till present time still assess the reign of Ivan the Formidable not based on facts, but however fancy takes them.

But let’s start analysing the eight-part series itself.

The fact that the territory of Russia doubled during the reign of Ivan the Formidable (translator note: and its population grew by 1.5x) is not mentioned at all.

Three minutes of serial time are devoted to Kazan campaigns and the capture of Kazan.

The Astrakhan campaigns and the capture of Astrakhan are not mentioned at all.

Although these two conquests – Kazan and Astrakhan – not only increased the country’s territory, but also created new trade routes, as well as secured the territory of Russia, ending the history of several centuries of predatory raids by steppe nomads.

The war with Sweden (which was started by the Swedish King Gustav I Vasa and in which he was defeated) is not mentioned at all. Although it opened up sea routes for Russia to trade not only with the Hanseatic League, but also with Britain.

The conquest of Siberia by Ermak is not mentioned at all. And in general, a bunch of self-styled historians will now tell you that Ermak conquered Siberia “despite” the tsar’s will. Although he received reinforcements from the tsar in the form of detachments of archers, artillery and gunpowder – but all this does not count, because Ivan the Formidable should exclusively be portrayed as a cardboard operetta villain.

In general, some chronicles of the sixteenth century directly indicate that a number of European rulers were very concerned about the strengthening of the Muscovite Kingdom and tried in every possible way to prevent it from establishing stable diplomatic and trade relations with the countries of Northern Europe and the Hanseatic League, for which, in particular, they diligently denigrated Ivan Vasilyevich and portrayed him as a bloodthirsty tyrant.

That is, we can say that nothing has changed much in the last five hundred years.

Meanwhile, by this time the Russian state already had a sufficiently developed bureaucracy (which, in particular, was previously caused by the need to pay a poll tax), and the documents of that era allow us to have a fairly accurate picture not only of the general demographic situation in Russia of the time, but also to know almost by name all the victims of Grozny’s repressions.
All in all, the chronicles and censuses give us a total number of about 2400-2500 convicts and executed during the reign of Ivan the Formidable.

Given that, on the one hand, he sometimes had to suppress riots and quite real (and not fictional, as some authors try to convince us) conspiracies, and on the other hand, only in Paris, more than 20 thousand Frenchmen were killed during one Bartholomew’s Night (and significantly more throughout France), the real historical Ivan Vasilyevich appears to us as a very gentle and merciful ruler.

Both considering the harsh circumstances in which he had to live and rule, and the bloody morals of the contemporary European rulers.

Though who is surprised? The modern United States has killed one and a half million Iraqis and almost four hundred thousand Afghans, but Russia and China are still the aggressors.

But let’s plough on through the story about Ivan the Formidable.

The distribution of bread to the poor in lean years, which prevented thousands of starvation deaths, is shown during one minute of screen time.

The introduction of a border quarantine for visitors (one of the first in the world!), which did not let the Plague that raged in Europe into Russia, is also shown in passing and almost as the foolishness of a mad tyrant.

The fact that metallurgy in Russia was rapidly developing under Ivan the Formidable, and Russian cannons were considered the best and sold throughout Europe is not mentioned even with a single word

Complete silence about the Ecumenical Councils and Grozny’s church reforms.

They are trying to show us that Ivan Vasilyevich, the first Russian tsar – is a mentally ill paranoid man with delusions of persecution, who sees traitors and conspiracies everywhere.

A contemporary of those events, Staden, in his notes directly wrote: “Many noble nobles gathered a considerable party in Lithuania and Poland and wanted to go up in arms against their tsar.”
As we can see, there are indeed conspiracies and traitors, and numerous in numbers, but this is not a reason to consider Grozny to be an adequate ruler! One can thus talk to a point saying that the West wishes Russia ill, and is not seeking to bring it the molecules of democracy.

Kurbsky is a real traitor, the Shuisky family really tried to control young Ivan as a puppet, Repnin and others negotiated with Lithuania and Poland to support a foreign invasion and overthrow Ivan, the Novgorod “elites” really wanted to defect to Lithuania – but Grozny is paranoid, paranoid, paranoid!

Such persistent attempts to portray Ivan the Formidable as a mad tyrant are more akin to hysteria.

In addition he has on his hands the Livonian War in the north and the Tartar raids in the south, while [he’s being portrayed as] grieving for five years over his poisoned wife. Hopelessness, and decay, and dementia.

Let’s look objectively.

  1. The creation of Archery regiment (Streltsy) is one of the first attempts in Europe (if not in the world) to form a regular professional army. And quite successful one at that. This is despite the fact that in most of Europe of that time, peasant militia and baronial squads were continued to be used.
  2. The All-Land Gathering (Zemsky Sobor) lays the foundations of parliamentarism.
  3. The Judicial Codex (Sudebnik) limited arbitrariness of the Boyars (similar to Counts), who before were free to judge and execute as they please anyone on their territory. Creation of a unified legislative system and a system of state courts.
  4. The Hundred-fold Gathering (Stoglavy Sobor) is a restriction of the power of the church.
  5. A system of state ministries (Prikazy) has been formed.

This is by far not the limit to the list of reforms of Ivan the Formidable.

And here we come to one of the most important innovations of Ivan – The Oprichnina.

Oprichnina is not just some medieval NKVD or KGB.

Oprichnina is, first and foremost, the introduction of the concept of “sovereign lands”. Not just the “patrimony” of the counts, but lands of the State, from which taxes are collected, in particular for the maintenance of regular troops. As well as for other needs, starting with the upkeep of “tsar’s men” (officials) and ending with a special tax for the ransom of Russians who were taken into slavery.

In fact, Ivan the Formidable introduced a two-fold economy. Something similar was introduced in Prussia by Frederick II, who received the nickname the Great for this. But Friedrich introduced it two hundred years after Ivan…

And, as a consequence of the introduction of sovereign lands, Grozny abolishes the “feeding” and introduces the Code of Service.

By the way, Grozny is such a tyrant-tyrant that during his reign several neighbouring territories voluntarily asked to be part of Russia. Apparently, there was a great lack of repression in their bodies.

Wait… after all, even now Pridnestrovie (Transnistria), Abkhazia, Ossetia, Donbass want to join the “tyrannical Russia”… how come?!

In fact, the entire reign of Grozny is not only a campaign of conquest, but also a constant struggle with feudal fragmentation and the formation of a centralized state. Oftentimes his reforms were ahead of their time.

Name us a country that would have passed this stage without the most powerful civil strife and even civil wars. We don’t know them.

But the series doesn’t tell us anything like that. Instead, we are obsessively told that an inner beast and darkness lives inside Ivan the Formidable, with which he copes for a while thanks to his wife and wise mentors from among the priesthood. But the wife is poisoned, and on the basis of grief, Grozny goes mad, executes the mentors or exiles them to Solovki.

Oh, and by the way! Grozny also founded the Printing Yard and helped the First Printer Fyodorov to start mass printing of books. But he does this, too, only under the wise guidance of silent mentors.

And then the Oprichnina begins, and it’s bad, bad, bad!

Basmanov and Vyazemsky are schemers who play on the tsar’s paranoia to rob the poor and unhappy Boyars.

In general, in this part of the series, the authors clearly relied on Kurbsky’s writings “The Story of the Grand Duke of Moscow”. Having fled to Lithuania, the traitor Andrey Kurbsky could not realize his huge ambitions, and therefore he took petty revenge on his former fellow citizens, carefully pouring mud on them (today Kurbsky would have clearly been a participant in the Open Russia forums in Vilnius).

So the authors of the series first portray Fyodor Basmanov as a homosexual (the girls look at him, but he does not look at them). There is no historical evidence for this, except for the writings of Kurbsky, who wrote to the point that he said that Basmanov was the lover of Ivan the Formidable (this is despite the fact that Grozny was a famous womanizer who actively played on the female field).

And then they reproduce the myth that Ivan forced the imprisoned father and son Basmanovs to fight each other, promising the winner life. Again, apart from Kurbsky’s writings, this is not confirmed by any other sources.

Kurbsky by this time had been living in Lithuania for several years, he did not have the Internet, and he could not know what was really happening in Moscow. Therefore, personally, we consider his nonsense a stupid lie of an offended figure. But why do the authors of the series rely on such dubious sources is a big question.

In general, from about the beginning of the fifth episode, it becomes extremely difficult to watch the series. Because the feeling of hopelessness of the narrative is simply off the scale. Everything is bad and will only get worse and worse. Crazy Salieri kills Mozart! Oh, sorry, it’s from another KVN performance…

Grozny is going more and more mad, the schemers around him are more and more insidious, the repressions are more and more senseless and bloody. The level of “truthfulness” is increasingly off the scale and is approaching the one from Solzhenitsyn.

The evil tyrant even orders to hide his library in a secret place, and Malyuta Skuratov kills all his subordinates who helped him hide it. That’s what a tyrant he is!
Although the real library of Grozny had most likely burned down during one of the many Moscow fires. But that would not be as interesing, a lot of people have been pretending for decades that they are looking for it and are about to find it soon – getting grants and scientific degrees.

Oh, yes! For the whole of Russia, there is exactly 1 (in words: one) supernindja. He, it appears, went behind the enemy lines (where-where?) during the Kazan campaign. And he worked as Adashev’s personal superagent. And he intercepted the messenger of Staritsky’s mother, preventing a civil war. And he stole a bottle of holy water from Skuratov. And he caught the murderer Grozny’s son, Dmitry. And he single-handedly dispersed of thirty Livonians, saving a particularly valuable German paper for Fedorov. And he got information about the movements of the Tatars. And he killed the leader of the Tatars.

In general, as Comrade Gogol wrote, “My grandfather was a liar, but he pales before your prowess.”

At the same time, judging by the general clumsiness of movements, the actor who plays him took about zero fencing lessons in his life. Luka Bondarev is the savior of Russia. Ivan the Formidable is a tyrant and despot.

And the battle of Molodi was won by the Russians – in the best modern tradition of “correctness” – “despite of” Grozny. And it does not matter that Archer regiments and Oprichnina troops, created by Ivan the Formidable, and led by guardsmen Vorotynsky and Khvorostinin are fighting there.

Again, Kurbsky wrote from his burrow in Lithuania that Vorotynsky was accused of trying to bewitch the tsar and burned. But at the same time he is not mentioned in the “Synod of the disgraced” – the list of those repressed by Grozny. And the count died a natural death.

So it turns out that judging the times of Grozny by the writings of Kurbsky is like judging modern Russia by the deliriums of Slava Rabinovich.

And allegedly Ivan the Formidable wanted to defect to Britain. There is no historical evidence for this, but why not throw in a lie about it as well?

In general, the series once again shows us that the whole history of Russia is darkness and horror, repression and death, Solovki and the GULAG, bloody decomposition. Pay and repent, repent and pay.

There are not enough people with brooms and dogs for such “creators”. To be gnawed out and swept out.

Unique Russian medicine “Areplivir” curing COVID-19 patients

About 1 month ago I wrote about the first in the world Russian vaccine against COVID-19. And now Russia comes with another break-through – a medicine that blocks COVID-19 and cures patients already infected with the virus. The medicine is now available in the apothecaries in Russia and is sold based on doctor’s prescription.

Here are some of the highlights from the “Argumenty i Fakty” article from 22.09.2020, titled “A Special Tablet: The makers on their Russian medicine against COVID-19”:

  • The medicine is called “Areplivir” and is created by “Biochemist” factory, which has over 60 years in experience of creating medicines.
  • The medicine blocks RNA-dependent-RNA-polymesasys, thus preventing the virus from replicating (therefrom comes the name of the medicine). The virus of COVID-19 lives 10 hours, so blocking its replication leads to a quick cure.
  • 80% of the patients experience improvement after 24 hours.
  • “Areplivir” is taken as a massive dose of 8 tablets 2 times a day for the first day, and 3 tablets twice a day thereafter.
  • 80% of the patients are cured after 5 days with no side-effects. The treatment is prescribed to last for 10 days, totaling 70 tablets.
  • The efficiency of “Areplivir” is 98%. Patients in medium to heavy conditions were participating in the clinical trials, and none of the patients died or required ALV.
  • The medicine uses “phavipiravir” as its active component, which has high safety grading with almost no side-effects. It should not, however, be taken by pregnant women and children.
  • “Areplivir” works against other virus types with the same reproduction mechanism: influenza, rinovirus, rotovirus.
  • Other laboratories in the world, in particular in China, are working on developing medicine based on phavipiravir, however the devil is in the detail, and so far only Russian “Biochemist” manages to develop an efficient composition.
  • An analogue of “Areplivir” is temporarily registered in Italy.